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Farm Journal Midwest Crop Tour - Day 2

 

Midwest Crop Tour – Day 2 Reports (August 22, 2017)

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

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Eastern Route

Day 2 Eastern Route Map

Dave Koehn
Dave Koehn
DuPont Pioneer
Agronomist


DuPont Pioneer Agronomy Report

Eastern Route - Day 2
Starts in Fishers, IN and ends in Bloomington, IL


Observations from Central to West-Central Illinois

Overall

  • "Variability" is a key word to sum up what the crop looks like & explain overall conditions.

Corn

  • Early April corn was planted under ideal conditions.
  • Later April corn was adversely affected by significant rains, resulting in stand variability across the area throughout the season in ear and kernel fill.
  • High temperatures both day and night in mid-July may have adversely affected overall kernel count.
  • All in all kernel counts are not bad, most fields will black layer soon.
  • Overall kernel depth and weight look good with mild temps in early to mid-August.
  • Fairly low disease pressure, minimal amounts of Gray Leaf Spot and Northern Corn Leaf Blight.
  • Harvest anticipated to start early- to mid-September.

Soybeans

  • Good planting window in May with heavy rains later in the spring, resulting in wide variability in overall stand counts with many fields being replanted.
  • Japanese Beetle pressure has been high for both corn and soybeans.
  • Minimal disease levels, although be on the lookout for further expansion of SDS or Frogeye Leaf Spot.

AudioLocal Crop Reports -- Dave Koehn

David-Koehn-8-22-2017.mp4

(03:36)

dave-koehn-pioneer60.mp4

(00:60)


Photos - Central Illinois

Corn ears tipping back.

These ears are tipping back, which is common this season. Photo taken near Springfield in Sangamon County.

Photo showing corn ear with good kernel depth and ear girth.

This corn ear has good girth and kernel depth. Photo taken near Springfield in Sangamon County.

Photo showing corn leaf with minimal gray leaf spot damage.

Some minimal leaf disease of GLS (Gray Leaf Spot). Photo taken near Springfield in Sangamon County.

Corn - near Springfield, Il.

Corn ears from near Springfield in Sangamon County.

 

The foregoing is provided for informational use only. Please contact your authorized Pioneer sales professional for information and suggestions specific to your operation. Product performance is variable and depends on many factors such as moisture and heat stress, soil type, management practices and environmental stress as well as disease and pest pressures. Individual results may vary.

 

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

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Western Route

Day 2 Western Route Map

Trevor Houghton
Trevor Houghton
DuPont Pioneer
Account Manager


DuPont Pioneer Agronomy Report

Western Route - Day 2
Starts in Grand Island, NE and ends in Nebraska City, NE


Observations from Southeast Nebraska

Overall

2017 Planting Challenges

  • A 4" to 6" soil compaction layer across the area due to wet conditions in 2015 and 2016.
  • Soil temperatures were 3-5 degrees above normal and this did help with corn emergence.
  • Seedling disease pressure was low, using Ethaboxam has helped.
  • Regarding insect activity, wireworms were noted in a few places. Mid-May soybeans were slower to emerge.

Weather - Nebraska City area - This area has seen 26" of rainfall since Jan. 1, with 21.5" since April 1st. June was warm with an average high at 85 and average low at 63. July 7 to the 25 saw no rainfall, although 1.5" on July 26 did help corn that started to fire mid-July. No rainfall again between July 28 and August 19, with cooler temperatures since July 26. Late rains will help soybean pod fill and test weight.

Current Crop Outlook

  • Crop has been challenged for rain but hung in there very well with cooler temps.
  • Rows around and ear length are decent in many areas, depending on spotty rainfall.
  • Soybeans have shown 4 bean pods in many fields, rains will help with fill.
  • Overall yield potential looks very good for both corn and soybeans.

Corn - Insects

Corn - Diseases

Soybeans - Insects

  • Thistle Caterpillars/Painted Lady Butterflies appearing.
  • Bean Leaf Beetle very low.
  • Grasshoppers strong.
  • Japanese Beetle pressure has been heavy, especially in Cass County.
  • Usual host of defoliators late in the season.

Soybeans - Diseases

  • Sudden Death Syndrome pressure is low with the warmer spring soil temperatures.
  • Foliar disease pressure light.

AudioLocal Crop Reports from DuPont Pioneer

Trevor Houghton - Account Manager

Trevor-Houghton-8-22-2017.mp4

(02:10)

Doran Johnson - Technical Service Consultant

Doran-Johnson-Pioneer60.mp4

(00:60)


Photos - Southeast Nebraska

Ears from Pioneer corn show plot.

This Pioneer corn show plot has great potential still with limited rainfall this July and August. Cooler temps have been key. New hybrids showing great ear flex. Photo from near Auburn, Nebraska, Nemaha County.

Southern rust symptoms on corn leaf.

Southern Rust in corn has really slowed with cooler temps and lack of rainfall since showing up in mid-July. Photo from near Dunbar, Nebraska, Otoe County.

Four-bean soybean pods.

Four-bean soybean pods have been the welcome surprise of the summer. Late rains Could prove very beneficial. New A Series varieties looking great. Photo from near Elmwood, Nebraska, Cass County

Japanese Beetle damage on soybean leaves.

Japanese Beetles were at treatable levels in soybeans and corn in July. This is the first year we have seen them at this level of pressure. Photo from near Murray, Nebraska, Cass County.

 

The foregoing is provided for informational use only. Please contact your authorized Pioneer sales professional for information and suggestions specific to your operation. Product performance is variable and depends on many factors such as moisture and heat stress, soil type, management practices and environmental stress as well as disease and pest pressures. Individual results may vary.

 

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Brian Grete
Brian Grete
Editor


Pro Farmer Crop Report

Eastern Route - Day 2
Starts in Fishers, IN and ends in Bloomington, IL


Eastern Tour Leader and Pro Farmer Editor Brian Grete noted he was soaked on his route through crop districts 4 and 5 in Indiana and crop districts 4 and 5 in Illinois today, with local farmers reporting they got 3 to 6 inches of rain and scouts noting standing water in fields. His samples in Indiana ranged from 133 bu. to 227 bu. per acre, for an average of around 174.1 bu. per acre.

Brian reports that while crops got more mature and variability was less extreme as his group moved through Indiana, the corn crop remains stressed. He details that recent rains may help stabilize the crop and prevent additional tipback, but for a lot of areas the rains came too late to do much good.

Beans, on the other hand, could build yield potential thanks to rains late in the growing season. That said, Brian reports beans were disappointing on his route through Indiana, yielding an average of 897 pods per 3' x 3' square. But he also cautioned that his is just one of 12 routes on the eastern leg of the Tour.

Brian's initial samples in Iroquois County, Illinois were pretty rough, but he reports samples improved as his route moved toward central areas of the state. However, he says the crop is still showing signs of stress in areas where tall, dark green and lush crops are the norm.

Get more information from Pro Farmer.


Chip Flory
Chip Flory
Editorial Director


 
Pro Farmer Crop Report

Western Route - Day 2
Starts in Grand Island, NE and ends in Nebraska City, NE


Pro Farmer Editorial Director and Western Tour Director Chip Flory reported disappointing pod counts on his route through districts 8 and 9 in Nebraska, cautioning that other routes may find better results. His route yielded an average pod count in a 3'x3' square of nearly 999 pods.

He details that pod counts were "nothing spectacular" and that there were some low ones. While crops looked good from the road, samples from the field were disappointing. "I'm a little confused by Nebraska beans, I'll be honest with you," Chip said, adding that he'd characterize the crop as "ordinary to a little less than normal." Weed pressure is again a concern in the state.

Chip says dryland corn was not as good as he saw last year on his route, detailing that stress on dryland corn has intensified as his route moved west. Irrigated corn was good, but not great, according to Chip.

Get more information from Pro Farmer.

 

How Midwest Crop Tour Scouts Gather Data

Background

The Midwest Crop Tour dates to 1987. Pro Farmer was an original participant, then agreed to take over as its organizer in 1993 and began publishing the Crop Tour’s results as a service to the agricultural community at large. Crop Tour helps “level the playing field” by providing all market participants with access to information, unlike the many ongoing private assessments of Midwest crops.

In 2000, Crop Tour was expanded to its current scale. Crop Tour supporters like DuPont Pioneer enable Crop Tour to survey a large geographic area, host daily grower meetings, and provide more extensive media coverage of the Crop Tour findings.

Conducted the third full week of August each year, Pro Farmer Midwest Crop Tour is the most widely followed “field survey” for corn and soybeans during the critical crop development period that happens in between USDA’s August and September crop surveys.

Scouts

More than 100 “scouts” (farmers, media, agribusiness, and Pro Farmer staff) are organized into teams that fan across 20 pre-determined Midwest routes Monday through Thursday. Scout teams travel in vehicles which prominently display “Midwest Crop Tour” decals. In addition, each scout wears Crop Tour logo apparel so that all Crop Tour participants are readily identifiable by farmers and landowners.

The “Eastern leg” begins sampling in western Ohio, working its way across Indiana, Illinois, eastern Iowa and then southern Minnesota. The “Western leg” begins in southern South Dakota, then across eastern Nebraska, western Iowa and into southern Minnesota. Both sides of the Tour conclude in Rochester, Minn., on Thursday night.

Scouts attend a training session prior to Crop Tour and each team of about 2 to 4 people includes at least 1 experienced scout. The assigned routes that the scout teams travel have been consistent over the years to assure comparability.

Crop scouts walk fields in seven states during the Crop Tour.

DuPont Pioneer agronomists and more than 100 volunteer crop scouts will tabulate measurements taken from corn and soybean fields during the 4-day crop tour.

Field Selection

Teams pull onto rural side roads every 15-20 miles from their primary route and stop at survey locations that meet the following criteria:

Crop Sampling and Data
Crop Tour sampling and measurements are designed to get representative results for crop districts, states, and the entire Midwest – not individual fields or counties.

  • Safe parking available on a wide shoulder or field driveway
  • Accessible corn/soybean fields that are not fenced or posted
  • No structures such as homes, machine sheds, grain bins, or livestock buildings
  • Scouts measure 3 ears of corn or count pods on 3 soybean plants from just 1 location in each field surveyed. Each sample is identified by county so it can be tabulated by crop district, but is not associated with a specific field or farm location. Care is taken to move in and out of each field quickly, without damage.
Corn grain length and girth are measured during the Crop Tour.

Several measurements such as grain length and girth of corn ears are taken to estimate corn yields.

 

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