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Estimating Corn Rootworm Beetle Populations with Sticky Traps (2017 Results)

 

Estimating Corn Rootworm Beetle Populations with Sticky Traps (2017 Results)

Objectives
Study Description
Results
2016 Results
Action Thresholds
Management Considerations

Objectives

  • Quantifying corn rootworm beetle populations in the summer allows growers to make better informed decisions regarding management options the following season.
  • A survey was conducted in 2017 to estimate corn rootworm population levels in fields throughout the central and northern Corn Belt using Pherocon® AM/NB sticky traps.

Study Description

Year: 2017

Locations: 685 fields in Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wisconsin

Sampling Methods:

  • Sticky traps placed in field beginning at blister stage (R2)
  • Sticky traps placed per field: 1 or 6
  • Beetles counted on each trap at 7-day intervals with the average per trap recorded
  • Trapping continued for 4 to 8 consecutive weeks
  • Trapping was conducted in both continuous corn and corn soybean rotated fields

    Western Corn Rootworm beetle / Northern Corn Rootworm beetle

Results

  • Corn rootworm population levels were categorized at zero, low, moderate, or high for each sampling location in 2017:
    • Zero = no beetles collected
    • Low = traps average < 21 beetles/week
    • Moderate = traps average 21-50 beetles/week
    • High = traps average >50 beetles/week
  • Maximum corn rootworm beetle population levels observed by location across all weeks (Figure 1 and Figure 2):
    • 7.2% of locations had zero adults collected
    • 75.9% of locations had low populations
    • 10.5% of locations had moderate populations
    • 6.4% of locations had high populations
  • Previous crop appeared to influence beetle populations. Across all locations the average maximum count for corn after corn was 19.8; whereas, corn after soybean was 5.5 (Table 1 and Figure 3):

    Maximum population levels observed at corn rootworm beetle trapping locations - 2017.

    Figure 1. Maximum population levels observed at corn rootworm beetle trapping locations in 2017.

    Chart showing maximum population levels observed at corn rootworm beetle trapping locations in 2017.

    Figure 2. Maximum population levels observed at corn rootworm beetle trapping locations in 2017.

    Chart showing seed treatment effect on soft red winter wheat grain yield across 11 locations in 2017.

    Table 1. Effect of previous crop on maximum beetle count averaged across all locations.

    Chart showing previous crop at corn rootworm beetle trapping locations in 2017.

    Figure 3. Previous crop at corn rootworm beetle trapping locations in 2017.

2016 Results

  • This same experiment was also conducted in 2016 with very similar results which can be found here on Pioneer.com.

Action Thresholds

  • Traps average <21 beetles per week
    • Low rootworm populations anticipated next year
    • Select a control option for low populations:
      • Rotate to another crop
      • Plant corn rootworm Bt corn product
      • Plant non-Bt rootworm Pioneer® brand corn products with Poncho® 1250/VOTiVO® insecticide seed treatment
      • Plant non-Bt rootworm product with soil insecticide
  • Traps average 21-50 beetles in a single week
    • Moderate rootworm populations anticipated next year
    • Select a control option for moderate populations:
      • Rotate to another crop
      • Plant corn rootworm Bt corn product
      • Apply soil insecticide at planting for larvae
  • Traps average >50 beetles in a single week
    • High rootworm populations anticipated next year
    • Select a control option for high populations:
      • Rotate to another crop
      • Apply foliar insecticide in the current year to control adult beetles prior to egg-laying and use a rootworm resistant Bt corn or soil-applied insecticide the following year
      • Consult with your Pioneer sales professional, university extension, crop consultants, or other local experts for recommendations if considering planting a corn rootworm Bt corn product and adding a soil-applied insecticide.

Management Considerations

  • Although DuPont Pioneer studies have shown that the HXRW trait remains an effective tool for corn rootworm management, DuPont Pioneer and university research suggests that continuous, uninterrupted use of the same corn rootworm Bt technology can lead to decreased corn rootworm susceptibility to that technology, and may result in reduced product efficacy against these insects.
  • To help maintain the efficacy of Bt corn rootworm products, it is essential to develop a multi-faceted rootworm management plan.
  • Your Pioneer sales professional or local Extension professionals can assist you in developing best management practices for your operation.
  • Please contact your authorized Pioneer sales representative or consult with your local University Extension for more information regarding insect resistance management, best management practices and to understand whether there has been insect resistance documented in your area.

Author: Jeff Mathesius

September 2017

 


The foregoing is provided for informational use only. Please contact your Pioneer sales professional for information and suggestions specific to your operation. 2017 data are based on average of all comparisons made in 685 locations through Sept 20, 2017. Multi-year and multi-location is a better predictor of future performance. Do not use these or any other data from a limited number of trials as a significant factor in product selection. Product responses are variable and subject to a variety of environmental, disease, and pest pressures. Individual results may vary.

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Poncho® and VOTiVO® are registered trademarks of Bayer.                                                
PIONEER® brand products are provided subject to the terms and conditions of purchase which are part of the labeling and purchase documents.

The foregoing is provided for informational use only. Please contact your authorized Pioneer sales professional for information and suggestions specific to your operation. Product performance is variable and depends on many factors such as moisture and heat stress, soil type, management practices and environmental stress as well as disease and pest pressures. Individual results may vary.

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