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Pro Farmer Midwest Crop Tour

 

Day 4 Reports - Midwest Crop Tour

Virg Robinson What do the Final Numbers Mean?
Virg Robinson, DuPont Pioneer market analysis manager, provides his perspective of the final numbers calculated following the Midwest Crop Tour.

 


 

Thursday, August 20, 2015

Eastern Route Josh Shofner, DuPont Pioneer Agronomist
Map: Day 4 Eastern Route

Daily Report

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Listen to local crop report
See photos

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Josh Shofner
Josh Shofner
DuPont Pioneer Agronomist


DuPont Pioneer Agronomy Report

Eastern Route - Day 4
Starts in Iowa City, Iowa and ends in Rochester, Minn.


Crop Report from Southern Minnesota

  • The corn crop across southeast Minnesota looks very good, with most of the corn at dent to early dent maturity. I’d estimate 80% of the corn is in excellent condition.
  • Heat units range from 1,800 to 2,000, depending on planting date. GDUs are slightly below average for southeast Minnesota, but because of early planting the crop growth stage is slightly ahead of the 5-year average.
  • There’s northern corn leaf blight in some fields, but in most cases it won’t limit yield.
  • Soybeans are very tall so there are concerns about diseases. There’s a lot of variability in soybeans and there will be big yield swings in southern Minnesota because of white mold,sudden death syndrome (SDS) and brown stem rot.
  • The crop still needs 30+ days of good weather to finish.

Local Crop Report (02:13)

day4_shofner_2015.mp4

Photos - Southern Minnesota

Corn samples

In Wabasha, Minn., corn yield estimate of 205 bushels per acre.

Northern corn leaf blight

Seeing some northern corn leaf blight across southeast Minnesota. Disease could play a role in final yields.

Waterhemp in field

Waterhemp will need to be addressed across southeast Minnesota moving forward.

Corn samples

Mower County in Minnesota. Yield estimate of 199 bushels per acre.

 

Chip Flory Exclusive Q and A: Chip Flory Answers Growers’ Questions on the Crop Tour
Chip Flory highlights the most frequently asked questions he’s received from growers along the Crop Tour.

 

The foregoing is provided for informational use only. Please contact your authorized Pioneer sales professional for information and suggestions specific to your operation. Product performance is variable and depends on many factors such as moisture and heat stress, soil type, management practices and environmental stress as well as disease and pest pressures. Individual results may vary.

Virg Robinson What do the Final Numbers Mean?
Virg Robinson, DuPont Pioneer market analysis manager, provides his perspective of the final numbers calculated following the Midwest Crop Tour.

 


 

Thursday, August 20, 2015

Western Route Brian Buck, DuPont Pioneer Agronomist
Map: Day 4 Western Route

Daily Report

Get full report

Listen to local crop report
See photos

Follow Tour on Twitter (#PFTour15)
Follow Tour on Facebook

Brian Buck
Brian Buck
DuPont Pioneer Agronomist


DuPont Pioneer Agronomy Report

Western Route - Day 4
Starts in Spencer, Iowa and ends in Rochester, Minn.


Crop Report from Southern Minnesota

  • Overall, the corn crop is consistent and looks great. Growing conditions this year are much better compared to the previous 2 years.
  • Corn is ‘growthy’ so it will be important to manage residue this fall.
  • Minnesota has a big corn crop, but it needs to get to black layer and finish without a frost.
  • Soybeans are also extremely ‘growthy’ due to rains early in the season and throughout the summer. Yield potential is good, but there’s also potential for white mold. In some pockets white mold is severe. SDS is also showing up in some areas.
  • This crop still needs good weather to finish.

Local Crop Report (01:11)

day4_buck_2015.mp4

Photos - Southern Minnesota

Sudden death syndrome

SDS is showing up in some southeast Minnesota fields. This disease is often worse with higher SCN pressure. SDS is often confused with brown stem rot so check stems.

Corn samples

Field in Goodhue County in Minnesota. Yield estimate is 216 bu/acre.

white mold

White mold is setting in strong in some southeast Minnesota fields. A lot of ups and some downs for soybeans.

 

Chip Flory Exclusive Q and A: Chip Flory Answers Growers’ Questions on the Crop Tour
Chip Flory highlights the most frequently asked questions he’s received from growers along the Crop Tour.

 

The foregoing is provided for informational use only. Please contact your authorized Pioneer sales professional for information and suggestions specific to your operation. Product performance is variable and depends on many factors such as moisture and heat stress, soil type, management practices and environmental stress as well as disease and pest pressures. Individual results may vary.

Thursday, August 20, 2015

Chip Flory

Pro Farmer Crop Report

Western Route - Day 4
Starts in Spencer, Iowa and ends in Rochester, Minn.

Chip Flory
Editorial Director
 


One-thousand, four-hundred and four. That's how many corn samples were pulled on the 2015 Pro Farmer Midwest Crop Tour. We visited with a lot of landowners and renters on the western leg of the Pro Farmer Midwest Crop Tour and they all added perspective to the crop potential in Minnesota. But, sometimes it's best to let the numbers talk for themselves.

The average number of pods in a 3'X3' square in the bean fields was 1,119.2, up 8.5% from last year's pod counts. While big pod counts don't necessarily translate into big bean yields, the amount of water this crop has available to fill pods suggests we should not underestimate the national average bean yield. If that water was available only to the Minnesota bean crop, there'd be no reason to "lean up" on the bean yield. But when Ohio, Indiana (as poor as they may be), Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Minnesota and South Dakota have moisture available to finish the bean crop, it's probably going to be better than most expect.

In the corn crop, the Crop Tour generated an average corn yield estimate for Minnesota of 190.9 bu. per acre, up 11.8% from last year. Everything is working together for the Minnesota corn crop this year. That's not to say the whole state is perfect... there are some holes in the crop... but a lot of the state has record corn-yield potential.

We've got a lot of numbers to crunch tonight. Thanks to all of the scouts on the Tour... we pulled a record number of corn samples at 1,404 -- a 60-sample increase over year-ago. They did a great job on two really wet days on both sides of the Tour... we greatly appreciate their efforts and look forward to next year when we gather on August 17, 2016!!

Get more information from Pro Farmer.


Brian Grete

Pro Farmer Crop Report

Eastern Route - Day 4
Starts in Iowa City, Iowa and ends in Rochester, Minn.

Brian Grete
Editor
 


Final Iowa results and thoughts

After pulling 412 corn samples from the state of Iowa, the average corn yield came in at 180.25 bu. per acre, up 0.8% from year-ago and 10.8% above the three-year Tour average. Compared to year-ago, Iowa crop districts 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 all came in above year-ago. Crop districts 6, 7, 8 and 9 came in under year-ago. The areas of the state that got plentiful, but not excessive moisture, all had yields that were higher than year-ago. The areas of the state that saw above-normal rainfall this spring and early summer returned lower yields compared to year-ago. Nitrogen deficiency from the excessive rains robbed the crop of yield potential. While Iowa's corn crop is very strong this year -- likely to be record-large in some areas -- crop districts 6, 7, 8 and 9 may put a cap on yield potential.

The 407 soybean samples from Iowa resulted in an average pod count of 1,219.21. That was up 3.9% from year-ago and 15.2% greater than the 3-year Tour average. Compared to year-ago, Iowa crop districts 1, 3, 4, 6, 7 and 9 returned soybean pod counts greater than last year's Tour results. Crop districts 2, 5 and 8 -- the 3 central districts in the state -- had lower-than-year-ago pod counts. While I (we) don't have a solid explanation for why the central 3 crop districts would have lower pod counts, it could be that the crop in districts 2 (north-central) and 5 (central) Iowa had too little stress. The crop put a lot of energy into building big, bushy beans and wasn't stressed enough to add a lot of pods. The crop in district 8 (south-central Iowa) was impacted by too much water that delayed plantings and/or left the crop sitting in saturated soils.

Chip and I would like to thank all of our hard working crop scouts for four days of dedicated work this week. We've said it thousands of times, but we can't do what we do on Crop Tour without your hard work. We hope to see all of you again in August 2016.

Get more information from Pro Farmer.

Get reports on Midwest crop conditions and photos from the field. Check out the map below to get precipitation, GDUs and corn growth stages.

Click a location marker to view details and get started.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Data is estimated using the Pioneer Growing Degree Unit Calculator, PrecipEstimator and Corn Growth Stage Estimator and is provided for informational use only.

Data Date:  

Eastern Route

Columbus, OH (43085)

Start Date (Plant Date) 5/8/2015
Precipitation

To DATE

NORMAL
14-DAY
FORECAST
29"
18.37"
0.29"
GDUs

To DATE

NORMAL
14-DAY
FORECAST
29"
18.37"
0.29"
Corn Growth Stage

GDU

GROWTH STAGE
29"
18.37"

Fishers, IN (46037)

Start Date (Plant Date) 5/8/2015
Precipitation

To DATE

NORMAL
14-DAY
FORECAST
29"
18.37"
0.29"
GDUs

To DATE

NORMAL
14-DAY
FORECAST
29"
18.37"
0.29"
Corn Growth Stage

GDU

GROWTH STAGE
29"
18.37"

Bloomington, IL (61701)

Start Date (Plant Date) 5/8/2015
Precipitation

To DATE

NORMAL
14-DAY
FORECAST
29"
18.37"
0.29"
GDUs

To DATE

NORMAL
14-DAY
FORECAST
29"
18.37"
0.29"
Corn Growth Stage

GDU

GROWTH STAGE
29"
18.37"

Iowa City, IA (52240)

Start Date (Plant Date) 5/8/2015
Precipitation

To DATE

NORMAL
14-DAY
FORECAST
29"
18.37"
0.29"
GDUs

To DATE

NORMAL
14-DAY
FORECAST
29"
18.37"
0.29"
Corn Growth Stage

GDU

GROWTH STAGE
29"
18.37"

Western Route

Sioux Falls, SD (57103)

Start Date (Plant Date) 5/8/2015
Precipitation

To DATE

NORMAL
14-DAY
FORECAST
29"
18.37"
0.29"
GDUs

To DATE

NORMAL
14-DAY
FORECAST
29"
18.37"
0.29"
Corn Growth Stage

GDU

GROWTH STAGE
29"
18.37"

Grand Island, NE (68801)

Start Date (Plant Date) 5/8/2015
Precipitation

To DATE

NORMAL
14-DAY
FORECAST
29"
18.37"
0.29"
GDUs

To DATE

NORMAL
14-DAY
FORECAST
29"
18.37"
0.29"
Corn Growth Stage

GDU

GROWTH STAGE
29"
18.37"

Nebraska City, NE (68410)

Start Date (Plant Date) 5/8/2015
Precipitation

To DATE

NORMAL
14-DAY
FORECAST
29"
18.37"
0.29"
GDUs

To DATE

NORMAL
14-DAY
FORECAST
29"
18.37"
0.29"
Corn Growth Stage

GDU

GROWTH STAGE
29"
18.37"

Spencer, IA (51301)

Start Date (Plant Date) 5/8/2015
Precipitation

To DATE

NORMAL
14-DAY
FORECAST
29"
18.37"
0.29"
GDUs

To DATE

NORMAL
14-DAY
FORECAST
29"
18.37"
0.29"
Corn Growth Stage

GDU

GROWTH STAGE
29"
18.37"

Final Stop

Rochester, MN (55901)

Start Date (Plant Date) 5/8/2015
Precipitation

To DATE

NORMAL
14-DAY
FORECAST
29"
18.37"
0.29"
GDUs

To DATE

NORMAL
14-DAY
FORECAST
29"
18.37"
0.29"
Corn Growth Stage

GDU

GROWTH STAGE
29"
18.37"

Back to Top

See how crops are progressing throughout the Midwest. Photos will be updated from mid-July through early August.

Ear in corn field north of Wood River, Neb. Photo taken during the week of August 3.

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Ear in corn field north of Wood River, Neb. Photo taken during the week of August 3.

Pioneer® brand soybean variety grown in field north of Wood River, Neb. Photo taken during the week of August 3.

Pioneer® brand soybean variety in field north of Wood River, Neb. Photo taken during the week of August 3.

Soybeans fields look very good overall — nice tall beans. Photo taken near Red Wing, Minn., during the week of August 3.

White mold is evident in some fields. Photo taken near Red Wing, Minn., during the week of August. 3.

Northern corn leaf blight is showing up in some fields but mostly at pressure levels that don’t require a fungicide treatment. Photo taken in the Red Wing., Minn., area during the week of August 3.

Ear with 18 rows of kernels from field in Edgar, Neb. Corn growth stage is late milk to early dough. Photo taken August 4.

Ear showing good pollination with 36 kernels lengthwise. This field is near Davenport, Neb. Photo taken on August 4.

Southern rust showed up last week in fields. Photo taken in northeast Nebraska during the week of July 27.

Northern corn leaf blight levels remain low. Goss’s Wilt was confirmed by Elmwood, Neb. Photo taken during the week of July 27.

Visual difference between crops grown on high and low ground in Wabash County (Indiana). Photo taken during the week of July 27.

Nitrogen deficiency in Noble County in Indiana. Photo taken during the week of July 27.

Gray leaf spot lesions on corn leaf in Adams County in Indiana. Photo taken during the week of July 27.

Northern corn leaf blight lesions on ear leaf and above in Elkhart County in Indiana. Photo taken during the week of July 27.

This ear shows an example of very good pollination. Photo taken in northwest Iowa during the week of July 27.

Soybean aphids are appearing in many fields in northwest Iowa. Now is a great time to begin scouting. Photo taken during the week of July 27.

Corn field at early brown silk stage looks great in Buffalo County in Nebraska. Photo taken during the week of July 27.

Irrigation is in full force. Corn field in Buffalo County (Nebraska). Photo taken during the week of July 27.

Pioneer® brand corn product in Howard County near St. Paul, Neb. Photo taken during the week of July 20.

Pioneer® brand corn product with silks starting to turn in Howard County near St. Paul, Neb. Photo taken during the week of July 20.

Soybean field canopy closure in Howard County near St. Paul, Neb. Photo taken during the week of July 20.

Showing pod set of Pioneer® brand soybean variety in Howard County near St. Paul, Neb. Photo taken during the week of July 20.

Cornfield in excellent condition shortly after pollination in Ford County (Illinois). Photo taken during the week of July 20.

Soybean field in Ford County (Illinois) in excellent condition. Photo taken during the week of July 20.

Now is a great time to scout for leaf diseases such as northern corn leaf blight in corn fields in northwest Iowa. Photo taken the week of July 13.

Rootworm larvae are actively feeding on some local fields in northwest Iowa. Now is an excellent time to scout for damage and formulate a management plan for future years. Photo taken the week of July 13.

Saturated soils followed by a 1-inch rainfall in Grant County, Indiana. Photo taken the week of July 13.

Corn in Grant County, Indiana, showing nitrogen deficiency. Photo taken the week of July 13.

Northern corn leaf blight lesions on corn in Kosciusko County, Indiana. Photo taken the week of July 13.

Gray leaf spot lesions on corn in Wabash County, Indiana. Photo taken the week of July 13.

Soybeans with brown stem rot symptoms in Kosciusko County, Indiana. Photo taken the week of July 13.

Soybean leaf with septoria brown spot symptoms in DeKalb County, Indiana. Photo taken the week of July 13.

Use of starter fertilizer paid off in a challenging spring. Photo taken on June 16 in Elmwood, Neb.

This is how many fields look if they got planted but it was then too wet to spray. Photo taken on May 29, 2015 in Rock Port, Mo.

Soybeans at R2 stage (full bloom) in a field east of Grand Island, Neb. Photo taken the week of July 6.

Cornfield in excellent condition at silking in Champaign County in Illinois. Photo taken the week of July 6.

Cornfield in Iroquois County (Illinois) showing yellowing and stunting from excessive rainfall. Photo taken the week of July 6.

Cornfield in Livingston County (Illinois) in late vegetative stages. Farmers are considering rescue nitrogen applications to compensate for N loss from excessive rainfall. Photo taken the week of July 6.

Soybean field in Champaign County (Illinois) in excellent condition. Photo taken the week of July 6.

Soybean field in Champaign County (Illinois) showing soybeans in both excellent and poor conditions due to excessive rainfall. Photo taken the week of July 6.

How Midwest Crop Tour Scouts Gather Data


Background

The Midwest Crop Tour dates to 1987. Pro Farmer was an original participant, then agreed to take over as its organizer in 1993 and began publishing the Crop Tour’s results as a service to the agricultural community at large. Crop Tour helps “level the playing field” by providing all market participants with access to information, unlike the many ongoing private assessments of Midwest crops.

In 2000, Crop Tour was expanded to its current scale. Crop Tour supporters like DuPont Pioneer enable Crop Tour to survey a large geographic area, host daily grower meetings, and provide more extensive media coverage of the Crop Tour findings.

Conducted the third full week of August each year, Pro Farmer Midwest Crop Tour is the most widely followed “field survey” for corn and soybeans during the critical crop development period that happens in between USDA’s August and September crop surveys.

Scouts

More than 100 “scouts” (farmers, media, agribusiness, and Pro Farmer staff) are organized into teams that fan across 20 pre-determined Midwest routes Monday through Thursday. Scout teams travel in vehicles which prominently display “Midwest Crop Tour” decals. In addition, each scout wears Crop Tour logo apparel so that all Crop Tour participants are readily identifiable by farmers and landowners.

The “Eastern leg” begins sampling in western Ohio, working its way across Indiana, Illinois, eastern Iowa and then southern Minnesota. The “Western leg” begins in southern South Dakota, then across eastern Nebraska, western Iowa and into southern Minnesota. Both sides of the Tour conclude in Rochester, Minn., on Thursday night.

Scouts attend a training session prior to Crop Tour and each team of about 2 to 4 people includes at least 1 experienced scout. The assigned routes that the scout teams travel have been consistent over the years to assure comparability.

Crop scouts walk fields in seven states during the Crop Tour.       Corn grain length and girth are measured during the Crop Tour.
DuPont Pioneer agronomists and more than
100 volunteer crop scouts will tabulate
measurements taken from corn and soybean
fields during the 4-day crop tour.
  Several measurements such as grain length
and girth of corn ears are taken to estimate
corn yields.


Field Selection

Teams pull onto rural side roads every 15-20 miles from their primary route and stop at survey locations that meet the following criteria:

  • Safe parking available on a wide shoulder or field driveway
  • Accessible corn/soybean fields that are not fenced or posted
  • No structures such as homes, machine sheds, grain bins, or livestock buildings


Crop Sampling and Data

Crop Tour sampling and measurements are designed to get representative results for crop districts, states, and the entire Midwest – not individual fields or counties. Scouts measure 3 ears of corn or count pods on 3 soybean plants from just 1 location in each field surveyed. Each sample is identified by county so it can be tabulated by crop district, but is not associated with a specific field or farm location. Care is taken to move in and out of each field quickly, without damage.

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Key Features

 
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